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Mental Health Issues Affect Nearly Half Adult Americans In Their Lifetime, Study Shows

Mental Health Issues Affect Nearly Half Adult Americans In Their Lifetime, Study Shows. Rick Rypien, above, and Wade Belak were both NHL players who suffered from depression and committed suicide this summer.

Mental Health Issues Affect Nearly Half Adult Americans In Their Lifetime, Study Shows. Rick Rypien, above, and Wade Belak were both NHL players who suffered from depression and committed suicide this summer.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, issued a report late last week, stating that more needs to be done for those suffering from mental health problems, since this affects nearly half of all adult Americans at some stage of their lives. This does not mean that half of all adults in America have mental disorders at any one time.

Surveys from across the country were collected for years to provide the data for this new government report which was published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. It reports that in 2009, there were some 11 million people, or 5 per cent of the population who experienced some type of mental illness which affected their ability to function properly. Furthermore, there were one million people who attempted to take their own lives, according to the study, with 8 times that considering suicide, while 2.2 million apparently even made plans to commit suicide.

These are staggering figures, and with the cost of treating these Americans being in the region of $300 billion in 2002 alone, it is easy to see why the researchers are calling for more help for these people.

Mental health issues are often hidden from the public eye, but this summer alone, two National Hockey League players committed suicide, Rick Rypien and Wade Belak, leaving the NHL with many questions as to how it could have helped them more. These players were receiving treatment, Rypien suffering for over ten years with depression, and Belak for 4 years. They had the resources to fund treatment, and had the support of their families and hockey clubs and teammates, but even so it was not enough at the end. For many thousands of others with depression and mental problems, the resources are not available, or else they are not sought.

Their deaths were a shock to the hockey world, but they may help to bring mental health issues into the open where people can receive more help for their individual needs. But more funding needs to be available, and mental health needs to be something that is discussed openly as an illness, and not hidden away. In fact there are very likely many cases which are unreported since many suffering from depression have a hard time admitting it and seeking the treatment they need.

Ileana Arias is the principal deputy director of the CDC. and said that the high cost includes care for the illness and lost productivity. Arias also said “Mental illness is frequently seen as a moral issue or an issue of weakness. It is a condition no different from cancer or other chronic diseases. People need to accept the difficulties they are having and avail themselves of the resources that are available.”

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Darina has played sports at a semi-professional level, and is a personal trainer with extensive experience in the sports, nutrition and general health areas.

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